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Resources For Educators

I am a Survivor of a Concentration Camp

On the first day of the new school year, all the teachers received the following note from their principal: I am a survivor of a concentration camp. My eyes saw what no man should witness:

Gas chambers built by learned engineers.
Children poisoned by educated physicians.
Infants killed by trained nurses.
Women and babies shot and burned by high school and college graduates.
So, I am suspicious of education. My request is: help your students become human.

Your efforts must never produce learned monsters, skilled psychopaths, educated Eichmanns.

Reading, writing, arithmetic are important only if they serve to make our children more humane.

– A letter written by a Holocaust survivor to educators, published in
“Teacher and Child” by Dr. Haim Ginott, child psychologist and author

  • Holland & Knight Remembrance Project
  • Newspaper in Education: Learning from Memories of History – A 24-page newspaper insert in the Tallahassee Democrat.
  • Recommended Books – For grades K-12 from the Center for Holocaust and Human Rights Education
  • USC Shoah Foundation Institute – The USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education, with an archive of nearly 52,000 videotaped testimonies from Holocaust survivors and other witnesses, is part of the College of Letters, Arts & Sciences at the University of Southern California.
  • Life In A Jar: The Irena Sendler Project – Protestant kids from rural Kansas, discover a Polish Catholic woman, who saved Jewish children. Irena Sendler and students from Uniontown, Kansas, they both have chosen to repair the world (Tikkun Olam). This web site shares the legacy and life of Irena Sendler, plus her ‘discovery’ for the world.
  • Anti-Defamation League – The Anti-Defamation League was founded in 1913 “to stop the defamation of the Jewish people and to secure justice and fair treatment to all.” Now the nation’s premier civil rights/human relations agency, ADL fights anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry, defends democratic ideals and protects civil rights for all.
  • The Power of Good – In 1939, Nicholas Winton personally saved the lives of 669 children. Most of them were Jewish — from Czechoslovakia, which was soon to be occupied by the Nazis. He brought them to Britain and kept it a secret for nearly 50 years. In 2002 Queen Elizabeth II conferred knighthood on Winton. Winton, now 99 years old, is an immensely compelling symbol of how a caring person can truly make a difference.
  • Teachers Guide Hana’s Suitcase Education Project – a teacher resource kit from the Montreal Holocaust Museum.
  • FSU Holocaust Institute for Educators – A week-long program at Florida State University provides teachers with the requisite knowledge, skills and abilities to teach their students and other teachers about the Holocaust.
  • Heroes: When Humanity Triumphs – published by The Afikim Foundation
  • The Holocaust Booklet – published by the Tallahassee Democrat, 2007

Katelyn Varn of Chiles High School wins History Fair Project on “Hidden Children from the Holocaust”

“Two summers ago I got interested in the Holocaust while visiting the National Museum in Washington DC . When the time came for me to pick a history fair topic I knew The Hidden Children of the Holocaust would be perfect. Although I am not Jewish, the Holocaust intrigued me because I could not understand how the human race could be so cruel to itself regardless of religious preference.”

— Katelyn Varn

Click here to view Katelyn’s project.